October 31st, 2018

Over one million people in the UK are living with an acquired brain injury (ABI). Acquired brain injury is brain damage caused by events after birth, as opposed to a genetic disorder or congenital disability.

The Manton Heights ABI Unit is a bespoke, modern and state of the art unit designed to facilitate and enhance the rehabilitation experience. We provide a range of specialised services to a broad range of individuals who face a range of issues as a result of brain injuries. Led by a consultant neuropsychiatrist, Dr Vanessa Raymont, the conditions we treat include:

  • Traumatic brain injury – the result of an accident or assault
  • Acquired brain injury – secondary to a stroke or haemorrhage, for example
  • Other long term neurological conditions

Living with an ABI doesn’t only lead to physical impairment; ABI can also result in cognitive, behavioural, psychological and emotional challenges.

An ABI can result in a great deal of changes, which can be temporary such as slight lapses in cognition and behaviour, to profound and permanent reductions in basic skills and loss of control of emotion and behaviour.

Sustaining an ABI can be a devastating experience for both the individual and their family. The impact is all the more confusing due to the lack of public awareness of the nature and effects of brain injury. To learn that a loved one has sustained a brain injury is very distressing for the family.

In addition, when the person has recovered sufficiently to recognise that he or she has sustained a brain injury, this can be both disturbing and a threat to their personal identity. There may then be a long struggle to regain physical, cognitive and social skills.

Manton Heights ABI Unit develops individually tailored rehabilitation programmes. Our programmes are defined by an individual’s needs, guided by their goals, and include their support networks of family, friends and loved ones, as well as their MDT team (Multi-Disciplinary Team).

We aim to ensure residents get the rehabilitation they need for the smoothest possible recovery, to lead the life they choose and, above all, to live in dignity.